Samuel Van Eenhoorn

Samuel van Eenhoorn

In 1678 Samuel van Eenhoorn inherited from his father one of the most famous and prestigious Delftware factories that history records, De Grieksche A (The Greek A). The family adventure started in 1658 when Wouter van Eenhoorn - Samuel’s father - bought what originally was a beer brewery. This particularly seasoned businessman already owned several…

Polychrome Model Of A Baby In A Cradle

Polychrome Model of a Baby in a Cradle

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome model of a baby in a cradle, dated circa 1765. The little baby lies comfortably in its bright yellow cradle. Of course, the yellow delineated in iron-red represents wicker, the perfect material to create…

Monkey Business In Dutch Delftware

Monkey Business in Dutch Delftware

With 2016 being the Year of the Monkey in Chinese astronomy, we would like to pay some extra attention to the monkey in Dutch Delftware objects. With their high intelligence and their humanlike behaviour in which we can recognize our own, monkeys and apes were either loved or hated. In art, from the fourteenth throughout…

The King Of The Waterfowl

The King of the Waterfowl

Over the centuries and throughout the arts the swan has symbolized beauty, elegance and perfection. Celebrating the popularity and the status of the noble swan, it is no surprise that historically the majestic bird often was chosen to decorate the table during a dinner party given by a prosperous family. As the hunt for this game…

Blue And White Charger

Blue and White Charger

On September 17, 1787, the United States Constitution was signed in Philadelphia. However, Holland was simultaneously undergoing a great deal of tumult with the Prussian invasion. This blue and white charger, dated September 16, 1787 is a poignant reminder of the event. The text on the charger reads “September 16 was elk in lij, 3…

The Poisonous Manufacture Of Delftware

The Poisonous Manufacture of Delftware

‘Do not ingest, do not breath dust’ warns Ralph Mayer in The Artist’s Handbook of Materials and Techniques in the white lead section, and indeed, since 1994, the material has been banned from sale within the European Union except under special conditions.[1] Today many traditional potters use non-lead glazes, but in the seventeenth and eighteenth…

The ‘Cashmire’ Palette

The ‘Cashmire’ Palette

A widespread interest in exoticism and eclecticism took hold in the late nineteenth century during a period known as the Aesthetic Movement. There was a rediscovery of the Golden Age of Delftware as collectors and intellectuals sought out objects designed in an orientalist style. This marked the first serious attempt to assemble, classify and study…

Garniture Of Three Polychrome Vases And One Cover

Garniture of Three Polychrome Vases and One Cover

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome three-piece garniture that demonstrates the use of cold-painted bright red. It was made around 1700 by De Paauw (The Peacock) Factory in the city of Delft. Although many factories used cold painted decoration,…

Windmills

Windmills

The windmills that dot the landscape of the Netherlands are as familiar as the local tulips, wooden shoes, and cheese. While they are visually charming and recall a past era, the invention of windmills shaped the Netherlands and its inhabitants. Windmills have existed in many different shapes in Europe since 1050. Structural mills with horizontal…

Cold Painting In Red

Cold Painting in Red

The range of colors seen on 18th century Delftware were achieved through various techniques, using skills honed throughout many years. Not every paint color could be realized in a single firing process, and there were often several rounds in the kiln. Ceramics painted with grand feu colors of blue, green, and yellow were fired at…