skip to Main Content
Polychrome Plate With Beautiful Butterflies At Aronson Antiquairs

De Drie Porceleyne Flessies (The Three Porcelain Bottles) Factory

De Drie Porceleyne Flessies (The Three Porcelain Bottles) factory was established in 1661. Like many of the other Delftware factories, De Drie Porceleyne Flessies was recognizable by a sign on its facade, which was described as ‘drije porceleijne flessen’ (three porcelain bottles) in a deed of 1665.1 The sign was still visible a hundred years…

Theepot De Metaale Pot Delfts Aardewerk

Van Verschuer’s Delftware Collection

There were three major collectors of Delftware in the nineteenth century. The two well-known figures are John F. Loudon (1821-1895) and A.H.H. van der Burgh (1845-1904), however there was a third lesser known nobleman baron Willem Frederik Karel van Verschuer (1845-1922). Despite his relative obscurity in history, his collection outnumbered Loudon and van der Burgh,…

Detail Of The Dollhouse Of Petronella Oortman, Ca. 1686 - Ca. 1710, Rijksmueum, Amsterdam

Dollhouses and Delftware Miniatures

According to the French anthropologist and ethnologist Claude Lévi-Strauss, miniature, that is to say the reproduction of an object in a reduced scale, is an art work that changes our relationship to the world. Its small size allows us to apprehend the object as a whole, as miniatures have an “intrinsic aesthetic quality”. They change…

Delftware Vase On Yellow Background

De Paauw (The Peacock) Factory

In 1651 De Paauw (The Peacock) factory was established. Painted on the facade of the building was the founding year and a beautiful blue and black peacock. The symbol became a trademark for the factory and was repeatedly used as a decorative motif on objects. When the factory first opened, it operated with only one…

Colorful Delft Blue

Since the early 1900’s modern ceramics produced in various Dutch and even German cities were popularly called ‘Delft Blue.’ These objects continued the successful tradition of seventeenth and eighteenth-century products from the city of Delft. While the antiques gained attention from both national and international collectors and researchers, the modern factories grew their assortment and also…

A Fantasized Orient

The Dutch East India Company (VOC) imported tens of millions of pieces of porcelain during the two centuries of its existence (1602-1799) and flooded the country with Chinese and Japanese tablewares. The decoration on these exotic porcelains gave a glimpse of a far away culture that many could never visit; it took almost a year to reach by ship.…

Delftware Brush Backs

Brush backs are rare surviving utilitarian objects that were made by Delft potters in imitation of the more expensive silver prototypes. Intended as clothes brushes, these practical objects were “often given as bridal gifts [and] may bear a date or a monogram, but since they were not signed, the makers...remain anonymous”.[1]  They were made by…

Havard Faience De Delft Book

Henry Havard’s Studies on Delftware

The work of the French art historian Henry Havard paralleled the rising appreciation and collection of Dutch Delftware in the mid to late nineteenth century. Born in 1838 in the Burgundy region of France, Havard was a radical figure in his youth. During the early years of the second empire, Havard participated in a revolutionary…

Charger Chinoiserie Design

Milk and Blood Porcelain and Delftware

Melk en Bloed, “Milk and Blood,” is the Dutch name for a special decoration on East Asian porcelain, in which the colors iron-red and gold dominate. These porcelains were imported from East Asia for only a short period of about 30 years in the early eighteenth century. Although Chinese Milk and Blood porcelain wares are…

Antique Delftware Wine Cooler

De Grieksche A (The Greek A) Factory

De Grieksche A (The Greek A) factory was founded in 1658. It was located on the site of a former brewery in the center of Delft, on the east side of the Geer (today Lange Geer) around the Rotterdamsche Poort. The succession of owners have each contributed to the prestige of the factory, making it…

Back To Top
X