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Thank you for your visit at The Winter Show in New York and at Art Affair in Amsterdam.
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From June 25 through 30 we will exhibit at TEFAF Maastricht.
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Cashmere Color Palette

Exotic scenes on Delftware Warm, intense colors; rich, dense patterns; landscapes with lush plants and exotic animals, the pair of vases above exude an exotic feel. While they might not seem to be typically Dutch, you might be surprised because the vases were made in Delft around 1700, using the cashmere color palette. Characteristic of…

Kendi in the kraakporselein style, Porcelain (hard paste), China, 1635-45. Gift of Leo A. and Doris C. Hodroff 2000.0061.076

The Kendi as a Source of Worldwide Fascination

Although kendis—handle- less bottles featuring small-tipped, often bulbous spouts—are not a form common to European and American material culture, they long have been popular in Asia. Regional names for such vessels include kondi (Sumatra), gendi (Java), kindi (Kerala, India) and the Malaysian kundikâ. Kendis were produced since antiquity in Southeast Asia. The Chinese began making…

Monteith, probably Delft, tin-glazed earthenware, painted with indecipherable marks in cobalt blue on base, ca. 1695. 6 3⁄4 x 131⁄4 in. (17.15 x 33.66 cm), 67.103, Historic Deerfield, Deerfield, Massachusetts. Photography by Penny Leveritt

Fashion Informs Function: The Fantastical Monteith

This odd-looking Dutch Delftware form is called a “monteith.” Monteiths were large bowls with scalloped rims that allowed wineglasses to suspend in chilled water. Their first appearance in 1683 is described by Oxford diarist Anthony à Wood (1632-1695), who wrote: “This yeare in the summer time came up a vessel or bason notched at the…

The Delft Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

The initial donation of a Delft eighteenth century plate in 1882 to the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art (renamed the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1918) provided the foundation for a collection of Dutch earthenware that now numbers over one hundred andtwenty five pieces. The unusual orange and blue decoration of this circa…

Fragrant Blue; The Scent of Floral Delft

Blue and white vases with spouts filled with multi-colored flowers are a stunning visual sensation. Perhaps due to their exclusive ownership and the short-lived nature of flowers, only a few depictions exist of how these vases were used in the late seventeenth century. An important visual source for their use is seen on two embroidered…

Royal Tableware from the Age of William and Mary

By around 1660 the fame of the Delft faience potters had spread far beyond the borders of the Dutch Republic. Delft earthenware was a prized possession of European monarchs. One such example is provided by the Delft dishes with coats of arms created for the court of the powerful French king Louis XIV. Under this…

Painted Enamel on Ceramics – The Encounter of Dutch and Chinese Pottery

The blue-and-white ceramic was long sought and loved worldwide, particularly since the introduction of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain in Europe in the fifteenth century. The arrival of Chinese porcelain triggered European potters to produce imitations of this unique Chinese product since the seventeenth century. In Delft, the imitation process first occurred in about 1620-1630 when a…

When Delft inspires Desvres by Sarah Vallin

Located in the Boulogne hinterland, Desvres has been producing pottery since Gallo-Roman times. The town, which now has a population of 5,000, welcomed its first earthenware factory in 1764–65, before seeing the rise of industrial-scale production during the nineteenth century, which peaked in the following century. Its famous tiles cemented its reputation well beyond the…

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