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Joy on the Ice on Delftware

Between 1550 and 1850, the Netherlands experienced exceptionally cold winters and relatively cool summers, a period in meteorological history known as the ‘Little Ice Age.’ The storms, freezing cold, ice and snow of these Dutch winters lent themselves to enchanting and atmospheric scenes often portrayed in seventeenth-century paintings. These joyful scenes of snow and ice…

Delft Silver

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the city of Delft boasted a number of flourishing industries in addition to the well known earthenware. There was a cloth industry, breweries, and also a rich silver industry. Around 1600, the finest silver objects in the Low Countries were made in Delft. The city was transformed when William…

De Metaale Pot Factory

In a building named “de metalen Poth”, located on the Geer, the present Lange Geer in the city of Delft, the factory arose in 1670 as the last in row of four Delftware factories. On the south side of De Metaale Pot (The Metal Pot) was 't Fortuyn ( The Fortune) factory and to the…

The Collection of A.H.H. Van der Burgh

At the end of the nineteenth century, there were very few pieces of Dutch Delftware in museum collections. The most important collections of Delftware objects, both in quantity and in quality, were assembled by private collectors. One of these important private collectors was John F. Loudon, whose collection of approximately 500 objects was donated to…

Polychrome Delftware Goat Butter Tubs

De Twee Scheepjes (The Two Little Ships) Factory

De Twee Scheepjes (The Two Little Ships) factory was active since 1619, and flourished especially in the eighteenth century. The factory was located on the south side of the Molslaan.1 In 1619, Adriaan Cornelisz. Kater purchased a house with a yard and a shed that may have already functioned as a pottery. This sale marks…

The Rococo Fever

The exorbitantly decorative rococo style of architecture and interiors swept through Europe in the eighteenth century. The style began in France during the reign of Louis XV, and quickly spread to other parts of Europe, particularly Bavaria, Austria, Germany and Russia. The style was a reaction against the more formal and geometric style of Louis…

Delftware Candlesticks

Before electrification, candles were the main source of light after dark. However, they were considered a luxury, even in the well-to-do home, thus the expression ‘the game’s not worth the candle,’ which highlights the fact that lighting a candle was like burning money itself. Tallow candles, made of animal fat, were the most commonly used…

Albertus Kiell

In the second half of the eighteenth century, De Witte Starre (The White Star) factory changed hands several times. One owner, Albertus Kiell, made an indelible mark on the Delftware industry during his lengthy period of employment. Kiell was born to Johannes Albertusz Kiell and Magdalena Catharina van Breugel in the village of Den Briel…

The Export of Delftware in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Producing millions of objects per year, the Delftware industry mainly found its market outside of Delft, a small city with only 24,000 inhabitants at the end of the seventeenth century.1 Delft potters were not dependent on passing travelers to distribute their products abroad, and Delftware was sold throughout Europe via domestic and foreign merchants.2 In…

William Blathwayt

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries Delftware was not only sold in the Netherlands, but was also exported to the surrounding countries. At the end of the seventeenth century, England was a major buyer of Delftware despite the embargo placed on Dutch Delftware imports in 1672 to support the country’s own ceramic production. However, the…

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