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Delft Ware Blue And White Dragon Jar

Blue and White Dragon Pattern Jar

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white covered ovoid jar painted boldly around the body with four scaly dragons. The jar bears the unidentified IW mark, which is probably for probably for Theodorus (called Dirck) Witsenburgh, the owner of…

Albertus Kiell

In the second half of the eighteenth century, De Witte Starre (The White Star) factory changed hands several times. One owner, Albertus Kiell, made an indelible mark on the Delftware industry during his lengthy period of employment. Kiell was born to Johannes Albertusz Kiell and Magdalena Catharina van Breugel in the village of Den Briel…

Blue and White Armorial Plate

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white armorial plate. The plate was commissioned at De Metaale Pot (The Metal Pot) factory during the ownership of Lambertus van Eenhoorn, from 1691 until 1721, or his widow Margaretha Teckmann until 1724.…

The Export of Delftware in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

Producing millions of objects per year, the Delftware industry mainly found its market outside of Delft, a small city with only 24,000 inhabitants at the end of the seventeenth century.1 Delft potters were not dependent on passing travelers to distribute their products abroad, and Delftware was sold throughout Europe via domestic and foreign merchants.2 In…

Blue and White Garniture

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white garniture. The garniture was made at De Drie Posteleyne Astonne (The Three Porcelain Ash-Barrels) factory, around 1690. Although Delftware initially was inspired on Chinese porcelain wares, the decoration of this garniture shows…

William Blathwayt

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries Delftware was not only sold in the Netherlands, but was also exported to the surrounding countries. At the end of the seventeenth century, England was a major buyer of Delftware despite the embargo placed on Dutch Delftware imports in 1672 to support the country’s own ceramic production. However, the…

Delftware Plaque For Wall Suspension

Blue and White Small Plaque

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white oval plaque, made around 1705. The plaque depicts a lively tavern scene. Peasants are reveling as they watch a couple dancing to the music of a horn or shawm player. A skeptical…

Parasols on Delftware

The Dutch East India Company (VOC) imported tens of millions of pieces of porcelain during the two centuries of its existence (1602-1799) and flooded the country with Chinese and Japanese tablewares. The Chinese porcelain introduced exotic imagery, such as depictions of dragons, temples and emperors. One can only imagine how enthralled the Dutch consumers must…

Blue and White Oval Barber’s Bowl

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white oval barber’s bowl. It was made around 1760 at De Porceleyne Byl (The Porcelain Axe) factory in the city of Delft. Other than often assumed, the round or oval depression at the…

De Porceleyne Byl Factory

De Porceleyne Byl (The Porcelain Axe) factory was founded in 1657, and was almost entirely owned by a single person or couple for its entire existence. This contrasts with most other factories whose property was often divided among several people. It was purchased in 1657 by Jacob Wemmersz. Hoppesteyn, who two years later would also…

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