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Pair Of Blue And White Octagonal Vases

Chinese Influences on Delftware

Soon after the introduction of expensive Chinese porcelain in the Netherlands, a demand arose for an attractive and affordable alternative. During the third quarter of the seventeenth century, Delft potters were able to expand the production of very refined faience for the higher end of the market after the limited importation of Asian porcelain by…

Blue and White Teapot

In every newsletter we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show this blue and white teapot from circa 1730. In Holland, where tea was an exotic and expensive luxury and consumed sparingly, teapots were of a small size. The tradition of drinking tea was strongly influenced…

The Attribution of a Wine Cooler

Beginning in the early 1680s, Delft potteries began to mark their wares with either the pottery owner’s initials or the name of the factory. Marks were applied for economic reasons, especially for foreign trade when the mark was a means of recognition and quality assurance, comparable with the modern trademark. The marking of objects contributed…

Delftware Banquet Table 17th Century

Setting the 17th and 18th-Century Table

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries fine dining was an exceedingly important social ritual, and the accompanying accessories were reflective of the owner’s status. The well-laid table was the culmination of splendor. However, dining traditions changed during these centuries and the Delft potters quickly accommodated the new tastes of the nobility and the wealthy bourgeoisie…

Rising International Competition

From 1720 to 1750, the Delftware industry faced a number of difficulties that challenged the future of the market. The War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714) had serious consequences on the Dutch economy. This war, which mainly took place in the south of the country, embroiled all of the major powers of Europe and created…

Polychrome Delftware Figures Of Oriental Women

De Porceleyne Lampetkan (The Porcelain Ewer) Factory

The history of De Lampetkan, or De Porceleyne Lampetkan factory began in 1609, when Abraham Davidsz. Oosterhouck bought a house called ‘De Burcht van Leyden’ that he transformed into a pottery.1 The factory changed hands many times throughout the seventeenth century. Oosterhouck owned the factory until 1619, and then sold it to Cornelis Harmesz. Valckenhoff,…

Stories on Delftware Plate Series

In Delft most factories produced both a high-end line of decorative objects and useful wares and a low-end selection of common utensils, which, ironically, are rarer today because they were used, worn out or damaged and then irreverently thrown away. What has survived today are generally the higher-end objects, in general more beautiful, more admired…

Polychrome Delftware Hare Tureen

Small Polychrome Crouching Hare Tureen and Cover

In every newsletter we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show this polychrome crouching hare tureen and cover from circa 1765. Zoomorphic tableware evolved from sugar or wax figures and bird-shaped pastries that decorated the Renaissance table. Especially the savory pie must have functioned as an…

The Disaster Year

“Het volk redeloos, de regering radeloos en het land reddeloos” (The people were irrational; the government desperate and the country irretrievable), no this is not a recent quote, it is a phrase that was coined to describe the state of Holland in 1672. In Dutch history, the year 1672 has from that time to present been known as “Het Rampjaar”…

Sheep Tureen

Polychrome Sheep Tureen and Cover

In every newsletter we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show this polychrome sheep tureen and cover from circa 1770. Zoomorphic tableware evolved from sugar or wax figures and bird-shaped pastries that decorated the Renaissance table. Especially the savory pie must have functioned as an inspiration…

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