skip to Main Content

Inleiding MAJOLICA
EARLY DELFTWARE DELFTWARE AFTER CHINESE BLUE AND WHITE WARES ARONSON.COM CASHMERE IMARI KAKIEMON MILK & BLOOD RED STONEWARE COLORED GLAZES GRAND FEU PETIT FEU COLD PAINTING WHITE DELFT BLUE AND WHITE DELFTWARE CONTACT
Discover the entire color palette of Delftware
Colorful Delft Blue Since the early 1900’s modern ceramics produced in various Dutch and even German cities were popularly called ‘Delft Blue’. These objects continued the successful tradition of seventeenth and eighteenth-century products from the city of Delft.

While the antiques gained attention from both national and international collectors and researchers, the modern factories grew their assortment and also produced similar objects with other color schemes and named them accordingly, i.e. Delft Red or Delft Green. The blue and white objects were however much more sought after and the name ‘Delft Blue’ stuck. The name soon became interchangeable between the modern and antique ceramics, however we refer to the antique objects as ‘Delftware’.

In turn, the popular term ‘Delft Blue’ means that nowadays many people are surprised that factories in Delft also made multi-colored, or polychrome objects in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The expanded range of colors, mainly after 1700, was rapidly supplemented by a range of forms, decorations and firing techniques. This is how Delft remained the market leader throughout most of the eighteenth century. Swipe to discover the entire color palette of Delftware.
menu close touch_app
Majolica Slide 1 The origins of Delftware lie in the early sixteenth-century majolica, the first consumer pottery in the Netherlands. This richly colored pottery was inspired by Southern European pottery, which is why the use of color and the designs look very Spanish or Italian. Early Netherlandish majolica consisted mainly of dishes and porridge bowls covered on the front in an opaque white tin glaze, and on the reverse with a less costly transparent lead glaze.

Majolica can be distinguished from Delftware not only by the clear glaze on the reverse, revealing the buff-colored body of the clay, but also by the three small spots of glaze damage on the front (prunt marks). These marks were created when the pieces were stacked on top of one another in the kiln, separated by ceramic triangles that were broken away after the firing. In that process, the point where the triangles had rested left a small unglazed mark. Majolica objects were often decorated with Southern European patterns, such as colorful fruits derived from Italian grotesque ornaments.
Majolica
Majolica Slide 2 Although it is impossible to identify and attribute the work of the forty-five potters in Haarlem, there is one exception: the wares of Willem Jansz. Verstraeten, who is considered the most important potter in Haarlem during the second quarter of the seventeenth century. MAJOLICA READ MORE Majolica Polychrome Large Dish AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1902
In the sixteenth century, many potters from Antwerp migrated to the Northern Netherlands and established themselves in various cities. By 1600, the city of Haarlem emerged as the leading majolica centre. Multiple inventories show that forty-five potters had settled there and the production of majolica increased proportionally.

Although it is impossible to identify and attribute the work of the forty-five potters in Haarlem, there is one exception: the wares of Willem Jansz. Verstraeten, who is considered the most important potter in Haarlem during the second quarter of the seventeenth century. The shape and aigrette border decoration of this charger are characteristic for the workshop of Verstraeten.

Circa 1630
Diameter: 33 cm. (13 in.)
€6.800
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
1 Proto-delft / early delftware There is an interesting group of Dutch earthenware that is the forerunner of Delftware. This group of objects was made in the transitional period between the exclusive manufacture of majolica and the early years of faience production (circa 1629-1669). The Dutch majolica potters were faced with competition after the arrival of Chinese porcelain on the Dutch market. Chinese porcelain was preferred over the Dutch product for its wider range of tablewares, and the thin and shiny surface inherent in the porcelain medium. As the demands for Chinese wares increased, the Dutch potters had to overcome both stylistic and technical challenges to imitate porcelain. These developments took place around 1620, with Haarlem and Delft playing leading roles in this process of innovation. These technical innovations were not all made simultaneously and many objects can be categorized in this group of early Delftware because they have qualities of both majolica and faience. Early Delftware 2 Proto-delft / early delftware This dish is part of a group of biblical dishes attributed to Haarlem which are differentiated technically from the Delft production. EARLY DELFTWARE READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1023
Blue and White Large Biblical Dish This dish is part of a group of biblical dishes attributed to Haarlem which are differentiated technically from the Delft production. The red pin marks on these Haarlem dishes differentiate the dishes from their Delft faience counterparts, which generally have pin marks in the same color as the ceramic body made of a yellow-firing clay. Further, the dishes have dripping glaze lines along the edge of the underside, resulting from the application of a second layer of white tin glaze on the front. This second layer of white tin glaze, is not known to have been used in Delft, where it was common to apply an additional layer of transparent lead glaze (kwaart) over the front after painting the blue decoration on the white ground.

Circa 1655
Diameter: 38.6 cm. (15.2 in.)
€16.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Early delftware 2 This model of a standing swan shows the earliest stages of the development of colored Delftware. EARLY DELFTWARE READ MORE SOLD
OBJECT NO. D1985
Model of a Standing Swan Although early Delftware is characterized by the use of a blue decoration on a white background, several factories started experimenting with colors in the second half of the seventeenth century. This model of a standing swan shows the earliest stages of the development of colored Delftware. Such early polychrome objects are extremely rare, and particularly three-dimensional models of animals and figurines. Although no similar objects are known, the decoration of the swan is similar to a pair of busts made around 1685. The busts of Salomé and Herod are executed in the same color palette: the colors blue, yellow and green with traces of red.

Circa 1690
Height: 17 cm. (6.7 in.)
close
skip_previous
Deftware after chinese The arrival of Chinese porcelain, thanks to the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in the seventeenth, reduced the demand for majolica. The Delft-based potters decided to imitate the much-loved blue and white porcelain wares. The Delftware painters adapted the scenery of both Chinese Kraak and transitional wares for their own decorations: chinoiserie landscapes of rock work and pine trees with and without figural subjects placed on a terrace or pavilion or even as horsemen. Other characteristic elements that found their way to Delftware are borders of stylized lotus-leaf shaped panels, pointed leaves and the tulip motif which was often used to decorate the neck of vases and ewers. Delftware after Chinese Blue and White Wares 2 Delftware after Chinese The faience painters chose especially the elements which were in their eyes the most characteristic for the exotic Far East and they combined it as they wished. DELFTWARE AFTER CHINESE BLUE AND WHITE WARES READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D0605
Blue and White Baluster-Form Jar and Cover
A unique type of decoration evolved from these different Chinese styles, which shows the Delft interpretation. Chinese figures, landscapes, architecture and attributes are rendered and composed in a way that is not Chinese, but semi-Chinese: chinoiserie. This style originated in the seventeenth century and quickly became a dominant fashion throughout Europe, enduring through the first half of the eighteenth century. The faience painters chose especially the elements which were in their eyes the most characteristic for the exotic Far East and they combined it as they wished. Delftware is one of the first Dutch examples of chinoiserie, which through its export contributed to the development of the style in Europe.

Circa 1685
Height: 36.5 cm. (14.4 in.)
€9.500
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
3 Delftware after Chinese The so-called ‘
confituur-starren
’ (‘preserve sets’) were used to serve sweetmeats and other delicacies such as dried fruit or summer fruit deserved in brandy and were generally used during tea time.
DELFTWARE AFTER CHINESE BLUE AND WHITE WARES READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D9007
Blue and White Compartmented Sweetmeat Dish
In the seventeenth and eighteenth century the potters in the city of Delft created magnificent sets of small plates, which were assembled surrounding a central star-shaped dish. These so-called ‘
confituur-starren
’ (‘preserve sets’) were used to serve sweetmeats and other delicacies such as dried fruit or summer fruit deserved in brandy and were generally used during tea time. The Delft potters did not only produce these elaborate sets; there are also compartmented sweetmeat dishes known, such as the present which has an Asian feel, being decorated with a peacock and a tiger amidst flowering shrubbery.

Marked AK in blue for Adrianus Kocx, the owner of De Grieksche A (The Greek A) factory from 1686 to 1701

Circa 1690
Diameter: 25.4 cm. (10 in.)
€5.800

close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Cashmere Slide 1 Delftware objects made between 1700 and 1720 were among the highly coveted objects of the nineteenth century. The delicate grand feu decoration of these Delftware objects was given the descriptive title ‘cashmere’ for its likeness in color, and exotic, dense motifs to the shawls that were imported from India and worn by high class European ladies. These objects often have a reeded surface and are decorated in blue, red and green. Occasionally, the pieces were also decorated with manganese and yellow.

Although the Delft objects were named after the fashionable textiles, the Delft potters were in fact inspired by the Chinese famille verte porcelain wares of the Kangxi period (1662-1722), which arrived in Europe at the end of the seventeenth century. Delftware painters also looked beyond China for further inspiration in designing cashmere pieces. One such design source was the French baroque style that reigned during the age of King Louis XIV. Since the production of these elaborate reeded pieces was probably too expensive, the cashmere palette enjoyed a brief, yet widespread success during the first half of the eighteenth century.
Cashmere
2 Cashmere At the end of the seventeenth century, the first Dutch Delftware garnitures were created, existing of three, five, seven and sometimes even more pieces. CASHMERE READ MORE SOLD
OBJECT NO. D1828
Cashmere Palette Garniture The design and display of garnitures follows the evolution of interior design in Europe, specifically the central role of ornamental ceramics. The fashion for grouping vases on mantels was a typical European phenomenon. With the Chinese porcelain wares, the objects were often acquired, or later commissioned, in pairs and displayed symmetrically on a mantelpiece, above a door or on a piece of furniture, such as a cabinet. At the end of the seventeenth century, the first Dutch Delftware garnitures were created, existing of three, five, seven and sometimes even more pieces.

The cover marked LVE 6 0 in iron-red for Lambertus van Eenhoorn, the owner of De Metaale Pot (The Metal Pot) factory from 1691 to 1721

Circa 1710
Heights: 22.9 to 29 cm. (9 to 11.4 in.)
Sold
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Imari inleiding The Japanese Imari porcelain wares, which are known for their rich blue, red and gold decoration, were at first intended for the Dutch East India Company’s own use in Batavia or for trade in Asia and, lastly, for the home market. Based on its limited importation and high cost in comparison to Chinese porcelain, Japanese porcelain could only satisfy a small demand in the Netherlands. However, Imari porcelain was exceptionally popular in the Netherlands throughout the whole eighteenth century. Delftware potters seized the opportunity to capture this sector of the market with the wares inspired by the popular Japanese objects. Soon after the first pieces of Japanese Imari porcelain arrived in the Republic, the colorful Delftware objects were produced. The Imari porcelain was an inexhaustible source of inspiration for the Delft potters. The Imari-style palette briefly adorned all sorts of utensils that responded to the latest fashion in dining objects and interior decoration. Imari Imari Slide 2 This flower vase is decorated in the Imari palette, inspired by the Japanese porcelain wares that reached the Netherlands with the Dutch East India Company. IMARI READ MORE Polychrome and Gilded Flower Vase AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1918
This flower vase is decorated in the Imari palette, inspired by the Japanese porcelain wares that reached the Netherlands with the Dutch East India Company. Although the colors were directly inspired by the Japanese wares, the form of the flower vase was taken from European, mostly Dutch, objects. Also, the decoration on this flower vase is mainly European with a lush bouquet in a vase.

Marked R in blue for De Roos (The Rose) factory within four four-dot clusters and three concentric lines

Circa 1700
Height: 21.3 cm. (8.4 in.)
€19.500
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Kakiemon inleiding Delft potters were particularly driven to reproduce the delicate pastels of the Kakiemon porcelains, experimenting with various color and firing techniques to achieve the Japanese style. The
petit feu
firing was one technique that allowed Delft potters to expand their color palette, and was first used in the early eighteenth century. The technique requires three firings, allowing the potter to use colors that could not withstand high temperatures in the kiln during the second firing (grand feu). The gold and enamel paints were applied after the biscuit firing, followed by the tin glazing and the transparent glaze that added extra gloss (with or without
grand feu
decorations). With the
petit feu
colors on top of the glaze, the objects were fired again at a lower temperature (about 600 degrees Celsius) in a smaller kiln known as the moffeloven (muffle kiln). The earliest known Delft
petit feu
decorations on white earthenware date from after 1720.
Kakiemon
Kakiemon 2 These jugs were intended as a game or a conversation piece during a dinner party. KAKIEMON READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1618
Petit Feu
Polychrome and Gilded Puzzle Jug
Dutch puzzle jugs are particularly rare. Since it was difficult to produce these jugs, and based on the fact that they are often dated, they probably were produced on special order. It was not the intention to pour or drink from it like a normal jug, as the pierced openwork on the neck of the jug makes clear. They were intended as a game or a conversation piece during a dinner party. A puzzle jug was referred to as a
‘suijgkan’
(‘suction-jug’) in inventory lists of factories and potters’ shops, a term that hints at the solution to the puzzle.

Circa 1730
Height: 19.6 cm. (7.7 in.)
€16.000
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Milk & Blood inleiding 'Milk and Blood,' is the Dutch name for a special decoration on East Asian porcelain, in which the colors iron-red and gold dominate. This type of porcelain was popular mainly among the Dutch, and the very few pieces that can be found elsewhere in Europe usually come from the Netherlands. The composition and iconography conform to the normal export assortment of blue and white Kangxi porcelain of circa 1700.

Within the wide range of East Asian porcelain color varieties, this type of decoration is only a temporary fringe. In the early eighteenth century, Milk and Blood porcelain was imported from East Asia in lower quantities than blue and white or famille verte wares. Moreover, the importation from China by Dutch traders occurred in a short period from 1700 to 1730. Although Chinese Milk and Blood porcelain wares are not uncommon, Delftware objects with a decoration painted only in iron-red and gold are extremely rare.
Milk & Blood
Milk & Blood D1919 In contrast to the Chinese Milk and Blood porcelain wares, Delftware objects painted with a similar style of decoration in iron-red and gold are extremely rare. MILK & BLOOD READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1919
Polychrome and Gilded Large Dish In contrast to the Chinese Milk and Blood porcelain wares, Delftware objects painted with a similar style of decoration in iron-red and gold are extremely rare. This Delft polychrome and gilded large dish is inspired by a Chinese porcelain example. The decoration shows a Chinese man and his attendant holding an umbrella and walking towards a female figure wearing flowing robes and holding a child. The cavetto and rim are decorated with large panels of flowering plants and a flitting insect.

Circa 1710
Diameter: 35.1 cm. (13.8 in.)
€9.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Red Stoneware inleiding Besides the alterations of color schemes, the Delft potters also capitalized on the successful Yixing stoneware teapots, and several Delft potters drew inspiration from the fashionable red stoneware. However, the potters faced several technical problems before achieving results. The composition of the clay had to be perfected in order to make watertight, unglazed pottery. The denser and more refined red clay was fired at a higher temperature than the yellowish clay used for the tin-glazed wares. Further, it had to be close to the Chinese object in color and hardness.

Another obstacle was the adaptation of the red clay to the familiar production techniques of the Delft potters. The Chinese potters traditionally formed their pots by modeling slabs of clay with their hands, whereas the Dutch potters were accustomed to throwing their vessels on a wheel, resulting in circular, ovoid or cylindrical shapes. Fortunately for the Delft potters, wheel-throwing created forms suitable for teapots, but it explains why so few other forms were created in this red clay body.
Red Stoneware
Red Stoneware - 8827 At least four Delft potters tried to imitate the Yixing teapots: Lambertus Cleffius, the owner of De Metaale Pot (The Metal Pot) factory, his cousin Samuel van Eenhoorn, the owner of De Grieksche A (The Greek A) factory, Samuel’s father’s former assistant, Ary de Milde and Jacobus de Caluwe. RED STONEWARE READ MORE Red Stoneware Teapot and Cover SOLD
OBJECT NO. D8827
At least four Delft potters tried to imitate the Yixing teapots: Lambertus Cleffius, the owner of De Metaale Pot (The Metal Pot) factory, his cousin Samuel van Eenhoorn, the owner of De Grieksche A (The Greek A) factory, Samuel’s father’s former assistant, Ary de Milde and Jacobus de Caluwe. In 1702 Jacobus de Caluwe bought part of the defunct Delftware factory of De Dissel (The Pole) from the widow of Adrianus Kocx, and resumed operations with the production of red stoneware teapots. This teapot shows the impressed lines alternating with small floral appliques that are characteristic for De Caluwe.

Marked with the impressed oval of JACOBUS DE CALUWE enclosing a running deer

Circa 1710
Height: 10.4 cm. (4.1 in.)
Sold
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Colored glazes inleiding By the end of the seventeenth century, many potters reached such a mastery of skill and perfection that they began experimenting with new forms and techniques. One ingenious result of this experimentation was the creation of colored background pieces. Inspired by Japanese lacquerwork the objects were manufactured in a black, brown and olive ground. Very few factories were able to execute the complex production of these pieces due to the difficult nature of manganese oxide, a chemical used to make the black color that does not react well with other colors. The potters also made objects with a blue background, after the faience from Nevers, France. On top of this glaze, a decoration was painted in a lighter color. It was a great challenge to obtain a finely executed decoration on the dark ground that did not run during firing. Colored Glazes Colored Glazes 2 Delft and English potters were inspired by the intense blue glazed wares produced in Nevers, from 1660 to 1680, known as
bleu persan
.
COLORED GLAZES READ MORE SOLD
OBJECT NO. D1723
Persian Blue Ewer Delft potters were inspired by the intense blue glazed wares produced in Nevers from 1660 to 1680, known as
bleu persan
. The Delftware that followed the style of Persian blue ceramics enjoyed a brief popularity around 1700, and examples are rare to survive. The blue ground wares produced by De Paauw (The Peacock) factory are very close to the Nevers ceramics. They share a depth of color, as well as the characteristic lotus flowers and irises that decorate the bodies. Under the leadership of David Kam and his widow, De Paauw specialized in the Persian blue color scheme, and this ewer fits within the factory’s outstanding style.

Circa 1700
Height: 19 cm. (7.5 in.)
Sold
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Colored Glazes 3 Black Delftware is one of the rarest color schemes found in Delftware: nearly seventy examples of black Delftware are known. COLORED GLAZES READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1725
Black Oval Plaque Black Delftware is one of the rarest color schemes found in Delftware: only about seventy examples of black Delftware are currently known. Shapes include smaller objects as tea wares, such as teacups and saucers, teapots, coffee pots, brush backs, and larger objects as ewers with dishes and plaques. This plaque has a chinoiserie decoration in the more usual colors red, blue, green, yellow and manganese, and is enriched with further black details in the costumes of the figures, and the molded rim, thus adding to the exotic feel of the plaque.

Circa 1710
Height: 19.2 cm. (7.6 in.)
Length: 21.4 cm. (8.4 in.)
€18.000
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Colored Glazes 4 The development of the
petit feu
palette and its success pushed the Delft potters to improve the
grand feu
palette, of which the colors became more intense, with new tones and shades.
COLORED GLAZES READ MORE SOLD
OBJECT NO. D1981
Small Turquoise Ground Plate From 1765, the fashion for Delftware painted with
grand feu
colors reappeared. The development of the
petit feu
palette and its success pushed the Delft potters to improve the
grand feu
palette, of which the colors became more intense, with new tones and shades. The transparent turquoise glaze was amongst the new colors, which has a luminosity comparable to glass, and evokes the Seldjoukide ceramics from thirteenth-century Iran.

Circa 1775
Diameter: 16.8 cm. (6.6 in.)
close skip_previous
Grand-feu colors inleiding The range of colors seen on eighteenth-century Delftware were achieved through various techniques, using skills honed throughout many years. Not every paint color could be realized in a single firing process, and there were often several rounds in the kiln. Ceramics painted with grand feu colors of blue, green, and yellow were fired at a high temperature of about 1000ºC (1800ºF). Although the seventeenth-century objects often exude an Asian atmosphere, from the mid-eighteenth century on the potters turned the focus on a more European formal language. In addition to crockery, they made all kinds of figures in the most diverse color combinations. Grand Feu Grand feu colors 2 Although probably modeled from life or from a drawing or print, the ceramic inspiration for this Delft figure of a stag can be found in Meissen porcelain. GRAND FEU READ MORE Polychrome Figure of a Stag AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1955
Deer, among the most common inhabitants of wooded areas throughout Europe, Western and Central Asia and North America, surely were the most popular game during the heyday of hunting. Hunting, as an important element of the courtly ceremonial, was the passion and privilege of the nobility, and beyond its original function of providing alimentation, it served as entertainment as well as an indicator of status. Although probably modeled from life or from a drawing or print, the ceramic inspiration for this Delft figure of a stag can be found in Meissen porcelain.

Marked JvDuijn in manganese for Johannes van Duijn, the owner of De Porceleyne Schotel (The Porcelain Dish) factory from 1764 to 1772, or his widow Van Duijn-van Kampen, the owner from 1772 to 1773

Circa 1770
Height: 26.5 cm. (10.4 in.)
€38.000
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Grand feu colors 3 Although the model of these recumbent cows is not uncommon, it is unusual to have a pair decorated in manganese. GRAND FEU READ MORE Pair of Polychrome Models of Recumbent Cows AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1959
Although the model of these recumbent cows is not uncommon, it is unusual to have a pair decorated in manganese. The objects are unmarked and therefore not attributable to a specific Delft factory. However, the streaky manganese decoration and the manganese-edged grassy base places them in a group with a pair of Delft figures of horses, also unmarked, but with the same decorative characteristics.

Circa 1775
Lengths: 14.4 cm. (5.7 in.)
€28.000
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
grand-feu color 4 The brown color of the horses' hide is referred to by the term chocolate or capucine brown, but is also named Batavia brown. GRAND FEU READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1343
Pair of Polychrome Figures of Horses The brown color of the horses' hide is referred to by the term chocolate or capucine brown, but is also named Batavia brown. Besides animals such as horses and cows, also other objects such as cachepots, garnitures, cups and saucers, were executed in this brown color.

One marked with an axe in iron-red for De Porceleyne Byl (The Porcelain Axe) factory

Circa 1765
Heights: 16.3 cm. (6.4 in.)
€29.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Petit Feu Inleiding Delft potters developed new colors and styles of decoration using the enamel technique. First used in the early eighteenth century, the so-called
petit feu
firing was one technique that allowed Delft potters to expand their color palette. The technique requires three firings, allowing the potter to use colors that could not withstand high temperatures in the kiln during the second firing (
grand feu
). The gold and enamel paints were applied after the biscuit firing, the tin glazing and the transparent glaze that added extra gloss (with or without
grand feu
decorations).

With the
petit feu
colors on top of the glaze, the objects were fired again at a lower temperature (about 600 degrees Celsius / 1100 degrees Fahrenheit) in a smaller kiln known as the
moffeloven
(muffle kiln). The painted objects were very colorful and delicate, however the additional firing made them expensive to produce and sell. Although the initial source of inspiration for the
petit feu
enamel painting came from Kakiemon porcelain, by the 1740s the taste had turned towards Meissen porcelain and its scenes of fashionable European figures in landscapes in the manner of the French painter Jean-Antoine Watteau (1684-1721).
Petit Feu
Delft dore petit feu 2 Butter dishes were indispensable in Dutch households, where at least one meal a day was cold and based on bread and butter. PETIT FEU READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1923
Pair of
Petit Feu
Butter Tubs, Covers and Stands
The change in taste also coincided with the evolving etiquette of table arrangements and dining. In order to welcome guests to a more abundantly-laid table, the shapes and sizes of tablewares grew larger and more elaborate, reflected particularly in the evolution of form and decoration of butter tubs and tureens, the most important and impressive pieces in any service. Butter dishes were indispensable in Dutch households, where at least one meal a day was cold and based on bread and butter.

Unidentified VA mark in blue, possibly for De Drie Posteleyene Astonne (The Three Porcelain Ash-Barrels) also sometimes referred to as De Vergulde Astonne (The Gilded Ash-Barrels) factory

Circa 1740
Heights: 9.4 cm. (3.7 in.)
Lengths: 18.2 cm. (7.2 in.)
€26.500
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Delft dore petit feu 3 This set of sweetmeat dishes shows the influence of Meissen porcelain in the use of colors and the execution of the decoration. PETIT FEU READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1922
Set of Six Polychrome and Gilded
Petit Feu
Heart-Shaped Sweetmeat Dishes
This set of sweetmeat dishes shows the influence of Meissen porcelain in the use of colors and the execution of the decoration. After 1720, the factory of Meissen set the trend in European ceramics. A particular influence seen on this Delftware set was Johan Gregor Herold, who was trained as a miniature painter and enameler on copper and was later appointed to take charge of the decorating atelier at the Meissen works. Herold not only improved the range of colored enamels for painting, but many ground colors as well. These technical achievements secured Herold a leading position in European ceramic history.

Circa 1740
Diameter whole set: 23.5 cm. (9.3 in.)
€19.500
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Cold painting inleiding Another technique to apply colors to the white glazed wares was with a so-called cold painted decoration. Unlike the lengthy and expensive process of the
grand feu
and
petit feu
colors, the cold painted wares were not fired after they were painted and therefore more economical. Several factories tried this technique, but the new method was met with resistance. The cold painted process required less work for the factory painters because the painting was executed by '
kladschilders
,' artists working with oil-paint. It is extremely rare to find objects that are still completely decorated in the cold paint technique, since at the beginning of the twentieth century scarce fragments of cold painted decoration were removed.
Cold Painting
Cold Painting 2 The decoration on the plate is often described as “
a compendiario en grand feu
", a style of painting adapted from mid sixteenth-century Faenza majolica executed in a palette of blue, yellow and orange on a pure white glaze.
COLD PAINTING READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1223
Polychrome Plate At the end of the seventeenth century, several Delft factories started experimenting with colors, such as De Paauw (The Peacock) factory. The characteristic color palette of De Paauw factory consists of the colors blue, green and yellow. These grand feu colors were often expanded with red. Red, however, was initially a difficult color for Delftware painters to fire; the metal oxides that gave the color to the glazes could not withstand the high temperatures of the kiln. In order to achieve a red decoration, De Paauw used the cold-painting technique. In this technique, a red lacquer-paint was applied to the decoration after the blue, green, and yellow paints had been fired.

Marked / D PAUW 2 in blue for De Paauw (The Peacock) factory

Circa 1700
Diameter: 26 cm. (10.2 in.)
€6.500
close VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Cold painting 3 Each year on the day of its patron St. Luke, the Butcher’s Guild would hold a parade celebrating the best-bred bull or cow from their guild. COLD PAINTING READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1964
Pair of Polychrome Cold-Painted Milking Groups Typical for the decoration of Delftware cows are the flower wreathes and garlands around their necks and backs, which can be related to those on the seventeenth-century ‘guild ox’. Each year on the day of its patron St. Luke, the Butcher’s Guild would hold a parade celebrating the best-bred bull or cow from their guild. The beast would be decorated with floral wreaths and ribbons, its horns often gilded and sometimes tipped with oranges; and the festive procession was joined by musicians. The meat of the animal was intended for the subsequent guild dinner, and a portion of it was donated to the church and the poor. The expression “the guild-ox is on parade” became synonymous with “this is a feast.”

Circa 1775
Lengths: 25.7 and 24 cm. (10.1 and 9.4 in.)
€16.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
White delft inleiding Despite all these techniques to add color to the Delftware objects, white undecorated Delftware was also very fashionable during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Being inspired by pure white Italian kitchenwares, Dutch potteries began to manufacture the sought-after white faience around 1600. White Delftware objects were produced for the domestic market and therefore are rarely marked or dated.

Although the white, undecorated ceramic objects were less expensive to produce than the blue and polychrome Delftware, the objects were initially only affordable to the upper class. By the end of the seventeenth century, white Delftware was more commonplace and affordable as factories produced greater numbers of white kitchenwares for everyday use. The factories also manufactured decorative white objects of figures and animals that were displayed on a mantelpiece.
White Delft
White delft 2 A wide range of white animal figurines was produced in the eighteenth century. WHITE DELFT READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1983
Pair of White Milking Groups A wide range of white animal figurines was produced in the eighteenth century. They include everything from cockerels, dogs, goats, cats, horses and cows to parrots, sheep and swans. Research and discussions continue as to whether many of the white-glazed and unpainted groups, such as the present pair of cows with milkers, were cold-painted after their production, perhaps outside of the factory, and that this unfired and thus relatively perishable form of decoration might either have worn off or have been removed intentionally for aesthetic reasons at a later date. On the other hand, it can be assumed that white-glazed, unpainted objects were produced specifically as more affordable alternatives to the more labor-intensive, and thus more costly, decorated examples.

Circa 1770
Heights: 17.8 cm. (7 in.)
€11.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Blue and white delftware inleiding Besides the many colorful objects that were produced in the eighteenth century, the Delftware painters also still created blue and white objects. However, these objects are different in style than the ones from the seventeenth century. Whereas the seventeenth-century objects were created in emulation of the Chinese porcelain wares and thus had an oriental decoration, the eighteenth-century blue and white objects have a more European feel. Not only the type of decoration shift to a more Western pattern, but also the shapes of the objects. Further, the color blue used by the eighteenth and nineteenth-century Delftware painters differs from the blue color on the seventeenth-century objects. It is this blue and white decoration that became the inspiration for nineteenth and twentieth-century Delft Blue. Blue and White Delftware Blue and white delftware 2 The wide assortiment that the Delft potters offered their clients contained also so-called ‘
wapengoet
’ or ‘armorial wares’, which were often commissioned for special occasions, such as a birth or a wedding.
BLUE AND WHITE DELFTWARE READ MORE AVAILABLE
OBJECT NO. D1368
Set of Four Armorial Tobacco Jars The wide assortiment that the Delft potters offered their clients contained also so-called ‘
wapengoet
’ or ‘armorial wares’, which were often commissioned for special occasions, such as a birth or a wedding. Initially these objects bear the coats of arms of cities, before they were marked with the coats of arms of families. However, objects bearing the coat of arms of cities stayed popular throughout the centuries, as can be seen in this set of tobacco jars. The coat of arms on this set of tobacco jars was given by William I, Count of Holland and Hainaut, to Rotterdam in thanks for the support of the lords of the Court of Wena in its fight against Flanders in 1304. The lions in the arms are the two red Dutch lions and the two black Hainaut lions.

Circa 1820
Heights: 25.4 to 26 cm. (10 to 10.2 in.)
€22.500
close
VISIT WEBSHOP skip_previous
Final slide Do you have any questions or remarks? Please fill out this form or Thank you for watching SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER READ OUR IN-DEPTH ARTICLES

skip_previous
Back To Top
X