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Slide Logo Aronson Delftware Wouter van Eenhoorn Samuel van Eenhoorn Adrianus Kocx Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx Jacob van der Kool Jan Teunis Dextra Jacobus Adriaansz. Halder Jan van den Briel Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld T H E G R E START SCROLLING E K A The Greek A Factory,
a Dynastic Business
In 1658 Wouter van Eenhoorn began pottery production in the former brewery known as 
‘De Griex A,’ creating what was to become a dynastic business. The consecutive owners established the factory’s reputation for superb craftsmanship, even referring to their wares as ‘porcelain.' It was this focus on high quality that laid the foundations for one of the most successful Delft factories.| This page is optimized for a bigger screen

W Wouter van Eenhoorn
1658-1678
In 1658 Wouter van Eenhoorn began pottery production in the former brewery known as ‘De Griex A.’ Although it is not certain whether Wouter used a mark on his products, he lost no time in establishing his factory’s reputation for superb craftsmanship, even referring to his wares as ‘porcelain.’ The factory’s early and continuing success was in large part the result of Wouter van Eenhoorn’s international contacts, which extended from Amsterdam to London, Hamburg and Bordeaux. It was for just such fine quality oriental imitations that De Grieksche A factory received a commission in 1667 from the city of Delft to make several ‘porcelain’ pieces for the wife of the Swedish ambassador ‘extraordinaris’ in Holland.

S Samuel van Eenhoorn
1678-1687
Samuel van Eenhoorn received De Grieksche A factory as a wedding present from his father in 1678. Samuel van Eenhoorn’s ownership corresponds to the beginning of the ‘Delftware Golden Age’. He ran De Grieksche A factory by himself for seven prosperous years, during which he is known to have enjoyed the patronage of the House of Orange. Technologically, he improved and refined the wares of the factory, and to the limited palette of cobalt-blue in various shades he introduced manganese-purple, which initially was used effectively to outline and define the decoration. Upon the death of Samuel van Eenhoorn in 1685, his widow Cecilia Houwaert inherited the business and ran it for a bit more than a year before selling the factory and its accoutrements to her brother-in-law Adrianus Kocx (who had married Samuel’s sister Judith) – a sale for which the arbiter was Lambertus Cleffius, her husband’s first cousin and the owner of De Metaale Pot.

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Blue and Manganese Baluster-Form Vase and Cover Objects such as this very fine blue and manganese baluster form vase are an example of luxurious pieces that were purely ornamental. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Delft blue and white ceramic vase Blue and Manganese Baluster-Form Vase and Cover Objects such as this very fine blue and manganese baluster form vase are an example of luxurious pieces that were purely ornamental. The decoration displays on one side two Chinese figures accompanied by their servant carrying a fan in a chinoiserie landscape, and on the reverse two men seated before a pavilion. The delicate use of manganese outlines gives a very particular charm to the scene. Circa 1680
Height: 29.8 cm. (11 3/4 in.)
Marked SVE 12 in manganese for Samuel van Eenhoorn

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Pair of Vases with Beast-and-Ring Handles This pair of vases embodies both the splendor of the Orient and the Western world. The chinoiserie decoration… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Vases with Beast-and-Ring Handles This pair of vases embodies both the splendor of the Orient and the Western world. The chinoiserie decoration evolved from different Chinese styles, which is freer and shows the Delft interpretation. The shape of these so-called 'altar vases’, however was almost certainly derived from French faience examples and is also known in French silver. The sculptural lion masks bear strong similarities to the baroque style designs of Daniel Marot. Circa 1680
Height: 27 cm. (10 5/8 in.)
Marked SVE 4 in blue for Samuel van Eenhoorn

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Blue and White Octagonal Bottle Vase This vase shows a decoration of Chinese figures, landscapes, and architecture, which are rendered and composed in a way that is not Chinese, but semi-Chinese: chinoiserie. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and White Octagonal Bottle Vase This vase shows a decoration of Chinese figures, landscapes, and architecture, which are rendered and composed in a way that is not Chinese, but semi-Chinese: chinoiserie. This style originated in the seventeenth century at the end of which it became a dominant mode throughout Europe, enduring through the first half of the eighteenth century. The Delft painter would especially choose the elements which were in his eyes the most characteristic for the exotic Far East and he combined it as he wished. Circa 1680
Height: 19 cm. (7 1/2 in.)
Marked SVE 2 1/2 in manganese for Samuel van Eenhoorn

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Pair of Blue and Manganese Vases During the 1670s, some Delftware factories began to use manganese in addition to the cobalt blue decoration. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Blue and Manganese Vases During the 1670s, some Delftware factories began to use manganese in addition to the cobalt blue decoration. De Grieksche A factory, under the ownership of Samuel van Eenhoorn, notably created objects inspired by Chinese motifs of the Kangxi period combined with other decorative elements borrowed from the Far East. The vases are decorated with delicately painted motifs, with shades that subtly vary from light blue to grey-green and white. With remarkable detail, the clothing and facial expressions are highlighted by a manganese outline known as trek. Circa 1680
Heights: 28.3 and 28.5 cm. (11 9/64 and 11 7/32 in.)
Both marked SVE and numbered 7 in manganese for Samuel van Eenhoorn

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Blue and Manganese ‘Wig Stand’ Wigs were important accessories for both men and women. Not only did wigs achieve a consistent look, but they also… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and Manganese ‘Wig Stand’ Wigs were important accessories for both men and women. Not only did wigs achieve a consistent look, but they also covered up myriad health and hygiene issues. However, scholars have argued the function of these stands, made in Delft during the seventeenth century and ranging in shape from spherical, octagonal, and many-sides. Due to these varying shapes that do not match common head sizes, it is more likely that these objects graced a table or a shelf in the paneling of a room, and were not actually used as wig stands. Circa 1680
Height: 18.2 cm. (7 11/64 in.)
Attributed to Samuel van Eenhoorn

Slide SAMUEL VAN EENHOORN Blue and White Plate Delftware painters often appropriated Chinese imagery and symbols, which appealed to European clients seeking objects with Oriental flair. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and White Plate Delftware painters often appropriated Chinese imagery and symbols, which appealed to European clients seeking objects with Oriental flair. However, these symbols were often interpreted freely and therefore lacked their original meaning. This plate shows an interpretation of the three friends of winter: the pine, bamboo and plum. While many plants and trees begin to wither away or shed their leaves in winter, the pine, bamboo, and plum seem to do just the opposite with their surprising display of vitality. The praise the Chinese have derives from the natural ability of these plants to withstand and even flourish in harsh environments. They became symbols that encouraged people to persevere in adversity, providing inspiration through consolation and determination. Consequently, these three became common subjects through the ages in Chinese art. Circa 1680
Diameter: 22.3 cm. (8 3/4 in.)
Marked 7 SVE in blue for Samuel van Eenhoorn

A Adrianus Kocx
1687-1701
Adrianus Kocx, a master potter and merchant, who was admitted to the Guild of Saint Luke as a shopkeeper in 1687, took the factory to even greater heights. Many of the objects produced under his management result in a symbioses between oriental motifs borrowed from Chinese porcelain and European designs. His ownership also corresponds to the creation of a wide variety of new shapes. Some of the designs have the particularity to have been borrowed from the French architect Daniel Marot. De Grieksche A continued enjoying the patronage of the most important clientele, including King William III and Queen Mary II.

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Pair of Blue and White Circular Salt Cellars Through the seventeenth and into the eighteenth century salt remained an important indicator of wealth and status on the dining table. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Two Blue and White Circular Salt Cellars Through the seventeenth and into the eighteenth century salt remained an important indicator of wealth and status on the dining table. The presentation vessels were often sizable and impressive. Although designed after a silver example, the present salt cellars have a chinoiserie decoration. Circa 1690
Heights: 12.5 cm. (4 59/64 in.)
One marked and numbered 22 AK 3, the other 0 AK 3 in blue for Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Pair of Blue and White Armorial Chargers Armorial dishes were often commissioned for special occasions, such as a birth or a wedding. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Two Blue and White Armorial Chargers Armorial dishes were often commissioned for special occasions, such as a birth or a wedding. From the first decade of the seventeenth century, wapengoet (armorial wares) became increasingly popular. The wares were decorated with the newly ascribed coats of arms of individual citizens. The families without coats of arms could order pre-decorated plates with fantasy coats of arms. This is the case with the present pair of dishes, which were ordered by the Rotterdam merchant. Circa 1690
Diameters: 35.2 and 40 cm. (13 55/64 and 15 3/4 in.)
Each marked AK in blue for Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Blue and White Sugar Caster and Cover In the second half of the seventeenth century, the French influence could be felt throughout Europe. During meals… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and White Sugar Caster and Cover In the second half of the seventeenth century, the French influence could be felt throughout Europe. During meals, the grandeur of the French court was displayed by the largest dinner services seen at the time. The Delft potters quickly took up the challenge to create the like in tin-glaze earthenware and looked around for examples to emulate in Delftware. Often, they found them in silver objects. Among the newly desired objects of use were also sugar casters. Casters like the present were filled with sugar candy that had been finely ground in a mortar, which resulted in a coarser sugar than we are used to today. Circa 1690
Height: 12.3 cm. (4 27/32 in.)
Marked AK in blue for Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Pair of Blue and White Plates Delftware painters often appropriated Chinese imagery and symbols, which appealed to European clients seeking objects with Oriental flair. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and white plates, Delftwaren Pair of Blue and White Plates Delftware painters often appropriated Chinese imagery and symbols, which appealed to European clients seeking objects with Oriental flair. However, these symbols were often interpreted freely and therefore lacked their original meaning. The rim decoration on this pair of plates shows for example beribboned Chinese symbols and ruyi-head motifs. The ruyi, which means ‘may your wish be granted’, is also the symbol of Buddhism and often presented as a gift for good wishes. It is also a symbol for longevity. Circa 1690
Diameter: 25.9 cm. (10 13/64 in.)
Marked AK in blue for Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Blue and White Large Wine Cooler At the end of the seventeenth century, a buffet for the elaborate service of wine included sumptuous services, such as this wine cooler. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Blue and White Large Wine Cooler At the end of the seventeenth century, a buffet for the elaborate service of wine included sumptuous services, such as this wine cooler. Larger wine coolers were filled with ice or cold water in order to chill the bottles in preparation for serving the wine. At the time, castles had ice-cellars dug deep into the ground, in which temperatures stayed low, and ice, harvested from ponds during the winter and packed in straw, could be stored during the warm summer months. Circa 1690
Length: 64.2 cm. (25 9/32 in.); Height: 27.3 cm. (10 3/4 in.)
Attributed to Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Pair of Bottle Vases From 1680, the Dutch East India company (VOC) started to massively import Chinese porcelain from the Kangxi period (1662-1722). MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Bottle Vases From 1680, the Dutch East India company (VOC) started to massively import Chinese porcelain from the Kangxi period (1662-1722). Much of this porcelain was decorated with a very delicate underglaze blue sapphire. The introduction of this new variety of porcelain in Holland encouraged the Delft potters to renew their repertoire. Their source of inspiration progressively passed from the Wanli to the Kangxi porcelain wares. Like this pair of Delft bottle vases illustrate, the work of Adrianus Kocx reflects this transition. From the first glance, the intensity and the brilliance of the blue on the milk-white glaze is striking. Circa 1690
Heights: 31.8 cm. (12 1/2 in.)
Marked AK in blue for Adrianus Kocx

Slide ADRIANUS KOCX Pair of Blue and White Bottle Vases During the Dutch Golden Age, the craze for tulips was so high that their price exceeded the value of a canal house in Amsterdam. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Object no. 1899 Pair of blue and white bottle vases. Delftware Pair of Blue and White Bottle Vases During the Dutch Golden Age, the craze for tulips was so high that their price exceeded the value of a canal house in Amsterdam. The tulip quickly became a status symbol in Europe because of its exoticism, and a profusion of varieties followed the original cultivation. The tulip mania reached its peak during the winter of 1636/1637, after which the bubble burst. However, the collapse of the tulip market did not diminish the Dutch appetite for flowers in art. The Dutch flower paintings persisted, and flower and tulip imagery remained a popular theme on Dutch Delftware. Flowers played an important role on plaques, plates and border decoration. A passion for flowers in the garden and the interior is also seen in this delicately painted pair of late seventeenth-century Delft vases. Circa 1695
Heights: both 31.2 cm.(12 9/32 in.)
Each marked AK n:11 in blue for Adrianus Kocx

P Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx
1701-1722
On January 24, 1701, the Kocx family celebrated a momentous occasion. The day marked the transfer of ownership of the prosperous factory De Grieksche A from Adrianus Kocx to his son, Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx. A festive dinner attended by the entire staff was organized to celebrate the event. Unfortunately, the happiness was short-lived. Pieter Adriaensz Kocx passed away only two years after he inherited the factory. Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx’s widow Johanna van der Heul took over the business, paying homage to her husband by continuing to use his mark PAK on her highest quality products. A qualified potter and a thoroughly competent manager, who surrounded herself with talented employees, by 1713 Johanna had in her employ four ‘gold painters’ whose contracts gave her the exclusive rights to their work as long as she owned the factory. During this period, De Grieksche A factory also decorated their wares with grand feu colors. Remarkably, Johanna van der Heul continued to experiment with various styles and techniques begun by her predecessors. She improved upon the petit feu colors with the creation of Imari decorated objects. De Grieksche A factory was one of the very first Delft producers of Imari patterns, and the technique quickly became a speciality of the prestigious factory.

Slide PIETER ADRIAENSZ. KOCX Polychrome and Gilded Jug and Cover The production of objects in this so-called Imari palette required two extra firings, which increased both the risk and the cost. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Polychrome and Gilded Jug and Cover The production of objects in this so-called Imari palette required two extra firings, which increased both the risk and the cost. After the first biscuit firing and the second glaze firing, which included the cobalt blue decoration, the iron-red was painted on the piece and it was fired a third time at a lower temperature of about 600 Celsius degrees (1050 Fahrenheit degrees). Finally, the gilding was applied and the piece was fired a fourth time in a muffle kiln at about 200C (390F). Circa 1710
Height: 19.8 cm. (7 3/4 in.)
Marked PAK no 6 in iron-red for Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx, or more likely for his widow Johanna van der Heul

Slide PIETER ADRIAENSZ. KOCX Pair of Polychrome Gilded Fluted Dishes The colorful Imari and Kakiemon Japanese porcelain wares reached the Netherlands between 1660 and 1670. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Polychrome Gilded Fluted Dishes The colorful Imari and Kakiemon Japanese porcelain wares reached the Netherlands between 1660 and 1670. They were immensely popular in the Western market, yielding high prices and inspiring Delft potters to emulate the colorful designs. Circa 1710
Diameter: 25.6 cm. (10 1/16 in.)
Marked PAK for Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx in iron-red, or more likely for his widow Johanna van der Heul

Slide PIETER ADRIAENSZ. KOCX Pair of Polychrome and Gilded Plates These plates are a direct emulation of Japanese Imari plates. Soon after the arrival of… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Two Polychrome and Gilded Plates These plates are a direct emulation of Japanese Imari plates. Soon after the arrival of the colorful Japanese Imari porcelains in the Netherlands in the late seventeenth century, the Delft potters responded to the demand for ware in this new style. They expanded the characteristic blue and white palette to include iron-red and gilding. Circa 1710
Diameter: 21.6 and 21.4 cm. (8 and 8 7/16 in.)
Marked PAK in iron-red for Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx, or more likely for his widow Johanna van der Heul

Slide PIETER ADRIAENSZ. KOCX Pair of Cashmere Palette Octagonal Rouleau Vases The cashmere palette first appeared in Delft potteries between 1700 and 1720. The term, ‘cashmere,’ was… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Cashmere Palette Octagonal Rouleau Vases The cashmere palette first appeared in Delft potteries between 1700 and 1720. The term ‘cashmere’ was attributed by nineteenth-century collectors who recognized a resemblance between the exotic motifs and colors of the fine woolen shawls that were coveted by wealthy European ladies and the very delicate grand feu decoration of these Delftware pieces. Circa 1710
Height: 21.9 cm. (8 5/8 in.)
Both marked PAK No 8 in iron-red for Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx, or more likely his widow Johanna van der Heul

Slide PIETER ADRIAENSZ. KOCX Pair of Blue and White Small Double-Gourd-Shaped Vases Between 1630 and 1640, porcelain wares of a superior quality were imported in Holland, known as “transitional wares.” The term refers to… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Blue and White Small Double-Gourd-Shaped Vases Between 1630 and 1640, porcelain wares of a superior quality were imported in Holland, known as “transitional wares.” The term refers to the political changes in China that transpired after the death of emperor Wanli (1619), which ultimately led to the fall of the Ming and the establishment of the Qing Dynasty (1644). The Delftware painters adapted the scenery on transitional wares for their own decorations and covered the entire area with a continuous scene that often consisted of landscapes with animals or figures either conversing or in a moment of spirited action. Circa 1710
Heights: 11.4 cm. (4 31/64 in.)
Marked PAK in blue for Pieter Adriaensz. Kocx, or more likely for his widow Johanna van der Heul

J Jacob van der Kool
1722 - 1758
In 1722 Jacob van der Kool acquired De Grieksche A factory. Coming from a family of potters, he was very familiar with the Delftware milieu. His grandfather Jacobus Willemsz. and older brother had run De Drie Flessies factory. When he died in 1733, his wife Cornelia van Willigen overtook the factory and continued to use her husband’s mark. With Cornelia van Willigen at the helm, the factory enjoyed international popularity, with merchants coming from Hamburg, Cologne and Paris. Van Willigen died in 1757, and the inventory that was made shortly after shows that she was extremely wealthy. It also illustrated the breadth of her production; the inventory lists ‘hundreds, even thousands of single pieces of decorative faience like east Indian plates, animal figurines: roosters, cows and horses, and household objects such as 2133 dozen matching tea sets, back of clothes brushes, oil and vinegar cruets, strawberry dishes and saucers, 120 cuspidors, etc.’

Slide JACOB VAN DER KOOL Polychrome Plate Colorful and delicately painted Delftware plates, such as the present, were no common utensils. They were decorative objects that were intended to... MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Polychrome Plate Colorful and delicately painted Delftware plates, such as the present, were no common utensils. They were decorative objects that were intended to be displayed on etageres, in glass cabinets or on walls. The representations on these plates are varied, and often reflect contemporary concerns and tastes. The chinoiserie decoration with exotic birds in flight or perched on a flowering branch amidst an abundance of flowers, is in complete accordance with the taste of the day. By the mid eighteenth century, Delft chinoiserie decorations were still the absolute fashion, and they became as exuberant in their coloration as in their exotic themes.  Circa 1750
Diameter: 22.1 cm. (8 45/64 in.)
Marked AIK in blue for Jacob van der Kool, or more likely for his widow Cornelia van Willigen

J Jan Teunis Dextra
1758-1764
De Grieksche A was bought by Jacob van der Kool and Cornelia Willigen’s son-in-law, Jan Teunis Dextra (also called Dextra De Jonge) in 1758. Objects bearing his mark are very rare. In the 1764 city council marks book, Dextra declared that his mark was only used for his best pieces ("achter mijn beste goederen"). For some other goods, the letter D was applied. This strategy suggests that Dextra used different commercial tactics in selling his goods. Although Dextra was a very talented potter and savvy businessman, he owned the factory only a short time, but continued to work as a foreman for the factory.

Slide JAN TEUNIS DEXTRA Polychrome Armorial Plate The arms and crest are those of Webster, Baronets of Battle Abbey, Co. Sussex, whose baronetcy was created in 1703, but became extinct in 1923. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Polychrome Armorial Plate The arms and crest are those of Webster, Baronets of Battle Abbey, Co. Sussex, whose baronetcy was created in 1703, but became extinct in 1923. From the date of this plate, it must have been made for Sir Whistler Webster, the 2nd Baronet and Member of Parliament for East Grinstead. Circa 1760
Diameter: 22.6 cm. (8 7/8 in.)
Marked D/12 in blue possibly for Jan Teunis Dextra

Slide JAN TEUNIS DEXTRA Pair of Blue and White Sauce Boats Changes in dining customs and refined entertaining from the beginning of the eighteenth century in Europe resulted in the production in both pottery and… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Blue and White Sauce Boats Changes in dining customs and refined entertaining from the beginning of the eighteenth century in Europe resulted in the production in both pottery and porcelain of large dinner services with a multiplicity of vessels, including sauceboats of various shapes. This pair of sauceboats, produced in a rococo style, indicates that the Delft factories produced tableware with contemporary style elements. The model of these kind of sauceboats is derived from silver examples. Initially, at the beginning of the eighteenth century, the Delftware industry produced round bowls with two pouring lips and two ears. Such sauceboats were also part of the production assortment of other faience and porcelain factories, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Also in the Far East, sauceboats were copied in Japanese porcelain around 1720. In the second half of the eighteenth century, porcelain sauceboats were also commissioned in China. These Chine de commande objects were however often supplied with a stand.  Circa 1760
Heights: 15.8 cm. (6 7/32 in.); Lengths: 20.6 cm. (8 7/64 in.)
Each marked A / D / 12 and numbered 105 in blue, possibly for Jan Teunis Dextra

J Jacobus Adriaansz. Halder
1764-1768
In December 1764, De Grieksche A was purchased by Jacobus Adriaansz. Halder and he registered his A I:H mark in March 1765. Although Halder only owned and ran the factory only for a few short years, he waisted no time in asserting his style on production. The objects were often characterized by the popular rococo designs of the era, but Halder also ventured away from ‘grand feu’ objects and produced wares in the muffle-technique, better known as ‘petit feu’ or small fire. By emulating the coveted German Meissen porcelain Halder tried to enlarge his market and by doing so his objects were known to give a very modern impression at the time.

Slide JACOBUS ADRIAANSZ. HALDER Polychrome Petit Feu and Gilded Vase and Figural Cover This vase beautifully combines the free undulations of the Rococo and exotic chinoiserie decorations. MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Polychrome Petit Feu and Gilded Vase and Figural Cover This vase beautifully combines the free undulations of the rococo and exotic chinoiserie decorations. The foot, bottom and top of the vase are built up entirely of rocailles, and the cover resembles shortened Chinese robes that drape over the edges. Further, the decoration on this vase imitates the color palette of Meissen porcelain wares. This model must have been so popular that it also rapidly fell out of favor and disappeared, since this type of vase is so rare. Circa 1765
Height: 44 cm. (17 21/64 in.)
Marked A/IH in iron-red for Jacobus Adriaansz. Halder

Slide JACOBUS ADRIAANSZ. HALDER Embracing Couple Group The exorbitantly decorative rococo style of architecture and interiors swept through Europe in the eighteenth century. Interiors were adorned with numerous… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Embracing Couple Group The exorbitantly decorative rococo style of architecture and interiors swept through Europe in the eighteenth century. Interiors were adorned with numerous ceramic objects, which were displayed on console tables, dining room tables, in showcases or on pedestals. The Delftware potters and painters experimented with rococo ornamentation to both break with the oriental models and to follow the new German and French styles. Consequently, a tremendous amount of human and animal figures of various sizes and models were produced by the Delft masters in order to satisfy a range of tastes. While these playful objects embrace the rococo spirit, they equally exude a characteristic Dutch charm and insouciance. Circa 1765
Height: 24.5 cm. (9 1/4 in.)
Marked AiH in blue for Jacobus Adriaansz. Halder

J Jan van den Briel
1768-1794
In 1768 the factory came into the hands of the Van den Briel family. Jan van den Briel’s widow, Petronella van der Laan, inherited the factory upon his death in 1783. In 1786 an anonymous shopkeeper was registered. The shopkeeper may have been a man named Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld because that same year, Pieter and Petronella were married. Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld and Petronella van der Laan are believed to have managed De Grieksche A together until she died in 1794.

Slide JAN VAN DEN BRIEL Pair of Polychrome Figural Candlesticks The Far East was a vivid source of inspiration throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Artists and craftsmen… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Polychrome Figural Candlesticks The Far East was a vivid source of inspiration throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Artists and craftsmen imitated and combined Eastern and Western shapes and patterns into chinoiserie designs. While the Delft objects made in the eighteenth century reflect a more Western style, the potters continued to take inspiration from Chinese wares. Although candlesticks of various shapes have been produced in Delftware from the 1680s onwards, a brightly colored figural pair of candlesticks is highly uncommon. Circa 1780
Heights: 28.5 and 28 cm. (11 1/32 and in.)
Each marked A / i vd B / 106 in blue for Jan van den Briel, or his widow Petronella van der Laan

Slide JAN VAN DEN BRIEL Pair of Polychrome Figures of Cows This pair of festively garlanded cows relate to the ‘Guild Ox’, an annual tradition that took place on the patron saint’s day in the… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Pair of Polychrome Figures of Cows This pair of festively garlanded cows relate to the ‘Guild Ox’, an annual tradition that took place on the patron saint’s day in the seventeenth century. A parade, organized by the Butcher’s Guild, would be hold to celebrate the Guild’s best bred bull or cow. Like on the present figures, the animals would be decorated with floral garlands and ribbons and the horns would often be gilded and sometimes tipped with oranges. Circa 1765
Lengths: both 22 cm. (8 21/32 in.)
Each marked A in blue for De Grieksche A

P Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld
1794-1804
Upon Petronella van der Laan’s death in 1794, her daughter Elisabeth van den Briel and Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld obtained the factory by joint inheritance. In 1796 Pieter then gained full ownership and in the same year became master within the Guild of Saint Luke.

Slide PIETER JANSZ. VAN MARKSVELD Polychrome Biblical Plate The identification of the mark is somewhat speculative, as in this form: P:VMV it is unrecorded. It could be interpreted as… MORE ON THE OBJECT The Greek A logo Polychrome Biblical Plate The identification of the mark is somewhat speculative, as in this form: P:VMV it is unrecorded. It could be interpreted as P:VM/, which would suggest it is the mark of Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld, of whom little is known, but the date of 1778 would place this plate prior to his assuming ownership of De Grieksche A in 1796, and possibly while he was working as a master painter at the factory, during which time he married Petronella van der Laan, the widow of the prior owner of De Grieksche A, Jan van den Briel, who died in early 1785. The uncertainty persists in as much as the Delft City Archives reveal a number of Pieter van Marksvelds in the appropriate time period, but does not mention their occupations. Dated 1778
Diameter: 22.3 cm. (8 3/4 in.)
Marked P:VMV in brown possibly for Pieter Jansz. van Marksveld
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