Dining Traditions

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries fine dining was an exceedingly important social ritual, and the accompanying accessories were reflective of the owner’s status. The well-laid table was the culmination of splendor. However, dining traditions changed during these centuries and the Delft potters quickly accommodated the new tastes of the nobility and the wealthy bourgeoisie…

Polychrome Figure of a Butter Vendor

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome figure of a butter vendor from 1760. Modeled as a young woman with a blue broad-brimmed hat and holding with both hands a large blue tub filled with three stacks of butter. Butter has been a…

The Decorative Designs of Daniel Marot

The French architect, designer and engraver Daniel Marot (1661-1752) was born into a family of artists and craftsmen. His grandfather, Girard Marot, was a cabinetmaker and his father, Jean Marot was named architect of King Louis XIV. Jean Marot (1619-1679) is well known today for his contribution to seventeenth-century French architecture. In 1686, Daniel Marot…

Blue and White Charger

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white charger from circa 1670. The importation of Chinese porcelain was halted after civil unrest in China during approximately forty years, starting from 1644. This opened up a great opportunity for Delft potters, whose faithful…

The Characteristic Works by G. Verhaast

The individual potters, painters and decorators of Dutch Delftware have largely remained anonymous as the makers’ marks inscribed on objects typically refer to the factory owners. There are a few rare exceptions, for example Frederik van Frijtom, who sometimes signed his work with his name or initials. Another known painter is a man with the…

Polychrome Armorial Plate

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome armorial plate from circa 1760. The arms and crest are those of Webster, Baronets of Battle Abbey, Co. Sussex, whose baronetcy was created in 1703, but became extinct in 1923. From the date of this…

West Meets East

Despite the Portuguese importations of Asian goods starting in the early sixteenth century, Chinese porcelain was rarely seen in Europe before 1600. The small quantities of porcelain that were imported to Europe were rare and expensive, and almost exclusively collected by the nobility. In 1600, the market for Chinese porcelain changed significantly when the Dutch…

East Meets West

The Dutch East India Company rarely encountered problems trading Chinese porcelain until circa 1645, when civil unrest in China increasingly hampered the VOC’s business. The production of porcelain was almost stagnated in Jingdezhen, supply routes were severed, and the VOC lost Formosa as a trading base in 1661. Since the Dutch East India Company had…

Blue and White Model of a Sleigh

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white model of a sleigh, from circa 1750. Delft sleighs are often referred to as pipe stands, however these objects were probably used for decoration. Examples of Dutch porcelain pipe stands from circa 1780…

The Chinese Dragon Pattern on Delftware

Auspicious, mythical and intriguing, the dragon was a creature that found its way onto Delftware from the Chinese porcelain and other decorative arts imported by the Dutch East India Company (VOC) in the seventeenth century. The origins of mythical Chinese dragons are vague, however it is believed that over 4,000 years ago, China was made…