De Witte Ster Factory

Located in the west side of Oude Delff street, the De Witte Ster (The White Star) factory was formerly a brewery. In 1660, two brothers-in-law, Willem Cleffius and Gijsbrecht Lambrechtsz. Cruyck, combined their assets to purchase a portion of the brewery. The two men, one an Amsterdam merchant, the other a Delft potter, had the…

Orangist Delftware

Delftware objects displaying Dutch monarchs, royal coats of arms and symbols of the Royal House, such as the orange tree, are known as Orangist Delft. Amongst the first Orangist Delft were the painted tile portraits of Prince Maurice (the stadholder of all the provinces of the Dutch Republic except for Friesland from 1585 to 1625), Frederick Henry…

Tulip Mania

During the Dutch Golden Age, the craze for tulips was so high that their price exceeded the value of a canal house in Amsterdam. Several others tales illustrate the tulip phenomenon, although the line between fact and fiction is often blurred. In one exaggerated account from the 1630s, a sailor was imprisoned for eating a…

Proto-Delft

Proto-Delft is an interesting group of Dutch earthenware that is the forerunner of Delftware. It is applied to the group of objects made in the transitional period between the exclusive manufacture of majolica and the early years of faience production (ca. 1629-1669).[1] The Dutch majolica potters were faced with competition after the arrival of Chinese…

Polychrome Model of a Child in a High Chair

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome model of a child in a high chair, from circa 1770. Traditionally Delft little high chairs and other models of nursery furnishings, such as cradles and fire baskets, were given as gifts to celebrate an engagement…

Collecting Delftware

Dutch Delftware played a pivotal role in the development of European ceramics in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The robust faience center of Delft was the result of two important currents of the time: the Italian production of majolica and the Chinese and Japanese wares that were imported by the Dutch East India Company (VOC).…

Dining Traditions

During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries fine dining was an exceedingly important social ritual, and the accompanying accessories were reflective of the owner’s status. The well-laid table was the culmination of splendor. However, dining traditions changed during these centuries and the Delft potters quickly accommodated the new tastes of the nobility and the wealthy bourgeoisie…

Polychrome Figure of a Butter Vendor

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this polychrome figure of a butter vendor from 1760. Modeled as a young woman with a blue broad-brimmed hat and holding with both hands a large blue tub filled with three stacks of butter. Butter has been a…

The Decorative Designs of Daniel Marot

The French architect, designer and engraver Daniel Marot (1661-1752) was born into a family of artists and craftsmen. His grandfather, Girard Marot, was a cabinetmaker and his father, Jean Marot was named architect of King Louis XIV. Jean Marot (1619-1679) is well known today for his contribution to seventeenth-century French architecture. In 1686, Daniel Marot…

Blue and White Charger

Every month we present a special object from the Aronson Antiquairs’ collection. This month we would like to show you this blue and white charger from circa 1670. The importation of Chinese porcelain was halted after civil unrest in China during approximately forty years, starting from 1644. This opened up a great opportunity for Delft potters, whose faithful…